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Tour de France: Renshaw abandons during second day in the Alps
July 24, 2015 (02:45) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
If Etixx-QuickStep sprinter Mark Cavendish wants to win the final stage of this years Tour de France on the Champs Elysees Sunday, hell have to figure out a way to do it without the services of ace lead-out man Mark Renshaw. The 32-year-old Australian abandoned the race during Thursdays 18th stage to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne after suffering the ill-effects of a migraine headach that started the day before. "Yesterday at the end of the stage I came down with a migraine before the final climb, and the pain never went away overnight," Renshaw said. "I woke up with the same pain this morning. It's pain from really stiff muscles in my neck, and that pain from the stiffness has gone up into my head in the form of a migraine.ADVERTISEMENT Renshaw said that while riding over every hole, bump and rough patch on the road Thursday, he could feel the pain in his head and the stiffness in his neck. I've never experienced anything like that before, he said. Together with the team we decided for me to stop. There is no way I could keep going like this. I already knew when I woke up this morning that it'd be hard to finish the stage. The pain was so intense and never lessened. If Cavendish can make it though the next two days, he will certainly feel Renshaws absence on Sunday when the race bears down on Paris and the sprinters get one last chance for glory. The Manxman has collected only one stage win in this years race, and hes certainly champing at the bit to add another. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France: Illness ends Cavendish's hopes for a win in Valence
July 20, 2015 (06:30) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Mark Cavendish said illness sidetracked his hopes for a 27th Tour de France stage win Sunday in Valence. The Manx Missile was off the back, fighting to make the time cut, when the predicted bunch sprint materialised and Andre Greipel took his third victory of the 2015 race. The Etixx-QuickStep sprinter, who was dropped on the first climb and forced to chase for the rest of the stage, said he was plagued with an upset stomach the night before. "I was up last night with stomach problems," Cavendish said. "In terms of the team's tactics, we prayed it would be an easy start. But we had the plan to get guys in the breakaway anyway.ADVERTISEMENT The 18km category 3 Cote de Badaroux began less than 10km into the stage and proved to be a rude awakening for Cavendish and his plan to add another Tour stage win to his palmares. After crashing out of the 2014 race during the fist stage, Cavendish notched his 26th Tour win this year on the stage 7 run toFougres. The stage 15 route looked like a ripe opportunity to add another, but Cavendish had long since lost contact with the main group by the time Greipel, John Degenkolb (Giant-Alpecin), Alexander Kristoff (Team Katusha) and Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) battled it out on the finishing straight. I felt empty at the start, Cavendish said. It's a shame because I was going good in the last couple of days. I had Mark Renshaw and Michal Golas with me, and we thought there was a chance we could come back. But once Katusha got on the front, and the TV cameras realize there's a chase happening and so go to the front of the peloton, you know it's going to be a long day for us guys behind. While Cavendish languished in the grupetto, his teammates Michal Kwiatkowski and Matteo Trentin infiltrated the nine-rider breakaway that held court until the peloton reeled them back to set up the bunch sprint. Trentin soloed away from the breakaway before it was caught, and he was soon joined by Cannondale-Garmin's Ryder Hesjedal. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France: Cavendish hoping for a sprint victory in Valence
July 20, 2015 (06:30) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Mark Cavendish, like all of his sprint rivals at the Tour de France, is tired after two intense weeks of racing but he is hoping for a shot at victory on Sundays stage to Valence. The 183km comes after two uphill finishes in Rodez and Mende and for the sprinters will fear like a welcome rain shower after two days in the French canicule. They will have to fight for a chance of success but they know it is the last stage with a flat finale before the final sage in Paris on Sunday July 26. All the other stages climb high and deep into the Alps, with lots of climbing before the finishes in Pra-Loup, Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, La Toussuire and LAlpe dHuez. Cavendish tried to save his strength and energy in the Pyrenees during the stages across the south of France. He finished 147th, alongside his loyal leadout man Mark Renshaw in Mende, 17:14 behind fellow Briton Steve Cummings.ADVERTISEMENT I hope tomorrows a sprint finish but you never know, maybe Tinkoff will go full gas on the category two climb but its a long way from the finish. Whatever, its the same for everybody, Cavendish told Cyclingnews, referring to Tinkoff-Saxos daily aggression as they fight to help Peter Sagan score points for the green jersey completion and the Col de lEscrinet that comes 56km from the finish of the stage. Sundays stage begins in Mende and the riders face a climb out of the small town and probably an aggressive first hour of racing as riders try to get into the breakaway of the day. The 1223-metre Col de Bez and the Col de la Croix de Bauzon after 70km will also hurt but the stage route then drops into valley at Jaujac. The Col de lEscrinet is 7.9km long and climbs at 5.8%. Tinkoff-Saxo could drive the pace to spit out the sprinters, with a pursuit match and chase likely to last all the way to the finish in Valence. Cavendish has been enjoying daily ice-baths to help cool his body after racing in the high temperatures and also help limit the damage to his muscles. He is hoping to be at his best for the expected sprint in Valance. Its something we have at Etixx-QuickStep every night, to cool down. It helps he explained. Theres a lot of tired legs [in the peloton]. Im tired. Its not easy, you know, it was a hard first week. Theres a reason why the Classics are one-day races. To have them back to back is hard. Im not the only one who is tired, so Im not the one complaining. Everyone is tired. The weather doesnt help. These are not your normal transitional stages. Normally we go along the Riviera in the south; this year were going straight into the Massif Central. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France podcast episode 8: Cavendish delivers stage 7 win
July 11, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Stage 7 saw Mark Cavendish (Etixx-QuickStep) get his first win at the Tour in two years, while the day provided a chance to relax for the peloton and the GC contenders as the sprinters' teams took control. MTN-Qhubeka's DanielTeklehaimanot made the day's breakaway again and added to his lead in the mountains classification before the peloton pulled him and his fellow escapees back into the fold. Andre Geipel led out the sprint, but Cavendish was able to surge past, followed by Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo). In the podcast, Cavendish talks about how he pulled it off and about the disappointment of losing Tony Martin in a stage 6 crash. Cyclingnews' European editor Barry Ryan and news editor Sadhbh O'Shea discuss what the win means for Cavendish and how it will affect the chase for the green jersey going forward. Froome talks about the pressure of having the yellow jersey back after Martin's abandon and what the coming days could bring for the general classification contenders, while Barry and Sadhbh discuss the favourites for Saturday's finish onMur de Bretagne.ADVERTISEMENT To subscribe to the Tour de France podcast on iTunes, click here, and go here for our fullTour deFrance coverage. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France: Cavendish's timing was better than mine, says Greipel
July 11, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
For the first time at this years Tour de France, Andr Greipel (Lotto Soudal) found himself having to settle for second place after he was bested Mark Cavendish (Etixx-QuickStep) in the bunch sprint to Fougres. Greipel has been far and away the strongest sprinter thus far but the German had to admit that he got it wrong. "I died too early. The timing of Cav was better than me," Greipel said after the stage. When the bunch split with just over a kilometre remaining Greipel - who lost one of his key lead-out men in Greg Henderson today due to injury " found himself isolated. The team regrouped, putting Greipel onto the back of the Katusha train and the Lotto Soudal rider kicked off the sprint as they approached the final corner. However, Cavendish was able to come up the inside and pip him on the line.ADVERTISEMENT "The team was again superb and Sieberg guided me perfectly into the last two kilometres. The sprint was initially ok, but in the end it was steeper than I thought, said Greipel. "So, I was a little dead and Cav was able to go over me. His timing was better, period. I have to be satisfied with second place." Fortunately for Greipel, he was able to hold off the late charge of Peter Sagan to keep hold of the green jersey. After failing to take a point on stage 6, and with Sagan taking back another point in the intermediate sprint, the gap between the two at the top of the standings was a slim two points. Had Sagan beaten him on the line, Greipel would have had to relinquish the jersey but he goes into the weekend marginally more comfortable 13 point lead. When Greipel came into the Tour de France he was adamant that he would not target the points classification, but after winning the sprint on day two the German has been very active in the intermediate sprints and hes fighting hard to keep it. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France: Etixx director Tom Steels analyses Cavendish win
July 11, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
After the 26th Tour de France stage win from Mark Cavendish, Etixx-QuickStep sports director and trainer Tom Steels provided Cyclingnews with expert insight. The former Belgian top sprinter won nine Tour de France stages and is most famous for his bidon-throwing at the 1997 Tour. After the win from Cavendish in the stage from Livarot to Fougres, Steels analysed Cavendishs performance. He explained how the pressure was mounting on the shoulders of Cavendish and how the team prepared for the sprint. He is who he is. Hes one of the top sprinters. He can falter completely but if hes good, like today, then hes still the fastest, Steels said.ADVERTISEMENT Steels said he believes Cavendish was physically capable of dominating the sprint for a few more years although his mental status would be crucial. It was a classy win, Steels said. If I saw how he accelerates today in comparison with a top sprinter like Greipel, of whom we have to admit that hes in top form. We havent seen Greipel in peak form at the Tour before. Mark can go on like this for a couple of years, but its a mental game too. Sprinting is about remaining fresh mentally, Steels said. Physically he can keep up for several years. Its mostly about the pressure. Second place is never enough. If he can cope with that hes capable of sprinting for a few more years. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Cavendish finds reason to smile as he opens Tour de France account
July 11, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
When you win, the world looks a rather different place. Following victory on stage 7 of the Tour de France in Fougres, his first of this race after two unsuccessful sprints, Mark Cavendish (Etixx-QuickStep) found mirth in unexpected places Post-stage press conferences at the Tour are held via a two-way video link, to spare the winner and yellow jersey a long trudge to the press room. From his vantage point in a mobile broadcast unit near the finish line, Cavendish performed a double take at the monitor in front of him at one point during his conference on Friday. "Is there a dude in the press room with socks on? Did I just see someone just in their socks?" Cavendish said, emitting a laugh that would not have been out at all of place in Tom Hulces portrayal of Mozart. "Yeah, there he is with his socks on."ADVERTISEMENT When unravelling the intricacies of a bunch finish, certainly, Cavendish operates on a different plane of understanding than just about everyone else. A reporter wondered what question he would most like to be asked, and it was perhaps telling that the Manxman offered his usual, forensic recap of the days bunch finish by way of response. After opening his sprint too early and fading at both Zeeland on stage 2 and Amiens on stage 5, Cavendish got his lines right on the slightly uphill finishing straight in Fougres, choosing the right time to swap Alexander Kristoffs wheel for that of his former teammate Andr Greipel. He came around Greipel inside the final 150 metres and then held him off for the win. "The last two sprints the team have done good, but Ive just kind of been too anxious, Ive gone too early," Cavendish said. "Thats the thing about the Tour: in another race where you maybe wait, in the Tour you have to hit out. In another race there are maybe one or two guys wholl come around you, in the Tour ten guys will come around you if you hesitate and then you lose the stage. Ive just been a bit over-anxious the last two times and todays been about not being impatient. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France stage 7 quotes: Joy for Cavendish and Etixx-QuickStep
July 11, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Mark Cavendish sprinted to his 26th Tour de France victory on stage 7, ending a two-year drought. For Etixx-QuickStep it is a third stage win in this year's Tour and comes after a bittersweet stage 6, which was won by Zdenek Stybar but which saw yellow jersey holder Tony Martin crash out with a broken collarbone. Cavendish started his sprint late and came from behind Andr Greipel, who had to settle for second after winning the two previous sprints in the race on stages 2 and 5. Whereas the flat stage revolved mostly around the fight for the yellow jersey, there was a fourth-category climb early on the parcours and Daniel Teklehaimanotgot himself in the break to extend his spell in the polka-dot jersey. After being the race leader on the road but not wearing yellow, Sky's Chris Froome will be back in the maillot jaune tomorrow.ADVERTISEMENT Patrick Lefevre, Etixx-QuickStep manager "Last night it was a mixture of happiness and sorrow. Today, it's only happiness. It's in no way a revenge. Only the media talked about revenge. Mark never had a revenge to take. He was always there. And we always knew we would be around him to support him until Paris." "For Mark, it's also a relief because he felt bad about what happened in Zealand and the criticism he received," Lefevre added,alluding to the events of stage 2, where Cavendish went too early and was called out for allowing Fabian Cancellara to take the yellow jersey instead of Tony Martin thanks to bonus seconds for third. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Froome keeps out of trouble to lead Tour de France in week 1 (The Associated Press)
July 11, 2015 (04:45) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Staying in front has meant staying out of trouble so far for Chris Froome at the Tour de France. ''Given what happened last year, it was a big goal for me mentally rather than physically to arrive with the attitude that I'm here to ride at the front of the race,'' Froome said after Friday's seventh stage. Mark Cavendish won a sprint finish Friday for his 26th career Tour stage victory - his first since 2013 after also crashing out last year. More...
Cycling: Cavendish takes stage win at Tour de France
July 10, 2015 (21:00) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
British rider Mark Cavendish won a sprint finish Saturday for the 26th Tour de France stage victory of his career, while countryman Chris Froome retained the overall lead as he bids to win the race for a second time.This time there... More...
Cycling-Cavendish back to winning ways on the Tour (Reuters)
July 10, 2015 (19:15) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
(Writes through with quotes) By Julien Pretot FOUGERES, France, July 10 (Reuters) - Briton Mark Cavendish sprinted to victory in the seventh stage of the Tour de France on Friday for his 26th career win in cycling's greatest race. Cavendish perfectly timed his effort to leapfrog German Andre Greipel (Lotto-Soudal), who finished second after winning two stages this year. Slovakian Peter Sagan finished third. More...
Cavendish wins 7th stage of Tour; Froome keeps overall lead (The Associated Press)
July 10, 2015 (18:30) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
British rider Mark Cavendish won the sun-soaked seventh stage of the Tour de France in a sprint finish on Friday, while countryman Chris Froome retained the overall lead as he bids to win the race for a second time. This time there was no crash near the finish, like the one on Thursday's sixth stage that cost German rider Tony Martin a broken collarbone, forcing him to withdraw while wearing the race leader's yellow jersey. Cavendish, seeking his first Tour stage win since 2013 after crashing out of last year's race, timed his attack to perfection to catch German sprinter Andre Greipel near the line to clinch his 26th career Tour stage win. More...
Cycling-Cavendish wins Tour de France seventh stage (Reuters)
July 10, 2015 (18:30) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
FOUGERES, France, July 10 (Reuters) - Briton Mark Cavendish of Etixx-Quick Step won the seventh stage of the Tour de France, a 190.5-km ride from Livarot on Friday. German Andre Greipel (Lotto-Soudal) took second place ahead of Slovakian Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo). Briton Chris Froome of Team Sky is the overall leader. (Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Alan Baldwin) More...
Cavendish wins 7th stage of Tour; Froome keeps overall lead
July 10, 2015 (18:00) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
FOUGERES, France (AP) " British rider Mark Cavendish won the sun-soaked seventh stage of the Tour de France in a sprint finish on Friday, while countryman Chris Froome retained the overall lead as he bids to win the race for a second... More...
Cavendish beaten into third in Amiens sprint
July 09, 2015 (06:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Mark Cavendish (Etixx-QuickStep) has been in the sprint game at the Tour de France long enough to know that, regardless of the result, he is always the story of the day after a bunch finish, but that doesnt stop him from railing against the idea every now and then. After being beaten into third place by his former teammate Andr Greipel (Lotto-Soudal) in Amiens on stage 5, for instance, Cavendish would doubtless have preferred to remain cloistered aboard his team bus, instead of addressing to the hefty portion of the Tours media corps who had set up camp outside.ADVERTISEMENT You'd do well to speak to Greipel, hes the guy who won today, Cavendish said at one point, his low voice barely picked up by the microphones that drew tightly around him. I think instead of the news being that I'm beaten again, maybe it should be that Greipel has won. He's a phenomenal sprinter, he's in the green jersey and that's the second stage he won this year. Four times in his Tour career to date " in 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2013 " Cavendish has broken the ice and scored his first win on stage 5, and his Etixx-QuickStep team worked diligently to ensure that he would have another chance to do so on Wednesday, a nervous day, marked by rain and wind. The anticipated sprint duly arrived, but the victory did not. Cavendish opened his effort with 250 metres and came past Alexander Kristoff (Katusha), but was out-stripped in turn by both Greipel and Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo), and had to settle for third place. It was a bit chaotic. I went around Sagan, then I kicked, he said. I saw Dmare kick and on his right, Kristoff. I went by Dmare and then drag stripped Kristoff, but then Greipel and Sagan just came past me in the end. I didn't feel great in the sprint, but nobody felt good today. I was going ok, they just went fastest. Before Cavendish emerged from the bus, Etixx-QuickStep directeur sportif Brian Holm had told the gathered reporters that the team had erred in having Cavendish commit himself so wholeheartedly during the previous days cobbled stage to Cambrai, which saw his teammate Tony Martin claim victory and move into the maillot jaune. It's hard to say, but we got the yellow jersey. I think the Tour de France is 21 days long and everything you do every day has an effect on the day after and the weeks after, but at the end of the day, that's what it's about, we had the yellow jersey and we were up there yesterday and today, Cavendish said, adding that holding the race lead and riding on behalf of a sprinter were essentially complementary endeavours for his Etixx-QuickStep team. When Cavendish and his old Highroad train were at their pomp, it seemed that he could more or less only be beaten by himself. Every defeat in those years seemed explicable by some error or element of misfortune in the run-in. In Amiens on Wednesday, however, Cavendish acknowledged that Greipel had simply beaten him for speed and strength in the final 150 metres. Today, he beat me. The other day [stage 2 "ed.] it was a mistake we made, we make one mistake in every 500 races we do, Cavendish said. Today I was just beaten. Cavendish would later point out that Matteo Trentin, suffering from a shoulder injury, had been a loss to his Etixx-QuickStep train on the run-in, but he quietly repeated that he was offering no excuses. I actually did a good sprint, but I was just beaten by two other guys, he said. The last time Cavendish went more than five stages into the Tour without opening his account was during his debut in 2007, when he abandoned the race at the end of the first week without notching up a victory. In this most mountainous of Tours, opportunities for the sprinters seem at a premium, and even at this early juncture, Cavendish will be hard-pressed to find the terrain to chalk up the five wins his manager Patrick Lefevere set as a target before the race began. Not especially, Cavendish said defiantly when asked if an early stage win would have been important for his confidence. We have 21 days in the Tour de France. Weve only got seven or eight sprints this year, a couple less, but there's still a few more stages left. And in each one, win or lose, like it or not, Cavendish will be the headline news. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Tour de France 2015 road bike tech
July 06, 2015 (14:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
This article originally appeared on BikeRadar As the Tour de France peloton busied itself with this year's first road stage, we were more concerned about the moving cavalcade of bikes that allow the riders to do their jobs. BikeRadar stalked through the line of team buses, dodging harried mechanics, stressed PR folk and nervous pros to bring you the latest Tour tech. Like the TT bikes we snapped on day one of the Tour, the biggest road-bike trend was obvious " GPS dongles and GoPro cameras.ADVERTISEMENT While the GPS units weigh only 20-30g according to one team mechanic, the GoPro setups that at least one rider per team per day has to use weigh considerably more. There's also the grams of drag to consider too, especially on a day that delivered on its promise of crosswinds, splitting the field and reshuffling the standings. There were two GoPro configurations. The Tour organizers were experimenting with live GoPro footage during the neutral rollout. This meant extra batteries and a broadcasting aerial added to the GoPro in order to stream video for some riders like Europcar's Tommy Voeckler who then switched bikes before the actual racing started. The second setup was just the standard GoPro mount, used on 12 bikes. Of the 12 selected riders, some were instructed to turn on their camera with around an hour's racing to go, which could involve some sketchy reaching around in the peloton. GoPro officials put a rear-facing camera on Mark Renshaw's bike, hoping to get good leadout footage of Mark Cavendish winding up for the sprint. (Renshaw did lead Cav out, but Cav jumped too early and ended up fourth on the day.) You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Team boss hits out at Cavendish after finale blip on Tour de France (Reuters)
July 06, 2015 (07:45) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
By Julien Pretot ZEELAND, Netherlands, (Reuters) - Etixx-Quick Step manager Patrick Lefevere hit out at his sprint ace Mark Cavendish after the Britons decision not to hang on in the final meters of the second stage of the Tour de France cost the team the coveted yellow jersey on Sunday. Sensing that he would not win the stage, a 166-km ride from Utrecht, Cavendish eased up before the line and in so doing allowed Fabian Cancellara to claim third place and the four seconds of time bonus that go with it. Had Cavendish finished third or higher, Cancellara would not have won the time bonus and Etixx-Quick Step rider Tony Martin, who was one second ahead of the Swiss after Saturdays opening time trial, would have ended up as the overall leader. More...
Team boss hits out at Cavendish after finale blip on Tour de France (Reuters)
July 05, 2015 (23:15) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
By Julien Pretot ZEELAND, Netherlands, (Reuters) - Etixx-Quick Step manager Patrick Lefevere hit out at his sprint ace Mark Cavendish after the Britons decision not to hang on in the final meters of the second stage of the Tour de France cost the team the coveted yellow jersey on Sunday. Sensing that he would not win the stage, a 166-km ride from Utrecht, Cavendish eased up before the line and in so doing allowed Fabian Cancellara to claim third place and the four seconds of time bonus that go with it. Had Cavendish finished third or higher, Cancellara would not have won the time bonus and Etixx-Quick Step rider Tony Martin, who was one second ahead of the Swiss after Saturdays opening time trial, would have ended up as the overall leader. More...
Cycling-Team boss hits out at Cavendish after finale blip on Tour de France (Reuters)
July 05, 2015 (23:15) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
By Julien Pretot ZEELAND, Netherlands, July 5 (Reuters) - Etixx-Quick Step manager Patrick Lefevere hit out at his sprint ace Mark Cavendish after the Briton's decision not to hang on in the final metres of the second stage of the Tour de France cost the team the coveted yellow jersey on Sunday. Sensing that he would not win the stage, a 166-km ride from Utrecht, Cavendish eased up before the line and in so doing allowed Fabian Cancellara to claim third place and the four seconds of time bonus that go with it. Had Cavendish finished third or higher, Cancellara would not have won the time bonus and Etixx-Quick Step rider Tony Martin, who was one second ahead of the Swiss after Saturday's opening time trial, would have ended up as the overall leader. More...
Cycling-Team boss hits out at Cavendish after finale blip on Tour de France (Reuters)
July 05, 2015 (23:00) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
By Julien Pretot ZEELAND, Netherlands, July 5 (Reuters) - Etixx-Quick Step manager Patrick Lefevere hit out at his sprint ace Mark Cavendish after the Briton's decision not to hang on in the final metres of the second stage of the Tour de France cost the team the coveted yellow jersey on Sunday. Sensing that he would not win the stage, a 166-km ride from Utrecht, Cavendish eased up before the line and in so doing allowed Fabian Cancellara to claim third place and the four seconds of time bonus that go with it. Had Cavendish finished third or higher, Cancellara would not have won the time bonus and Etixx-Quick Step rider Tony Martin, who was one second ahead of the Swiss after Saturday's opening time trial, would have ended up as the overall leader. More...

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