Cycling News
Ontheminute.com

SEARCH RESULTS FOR: armstrong

Cookson: Verbruggen and McQuaid actions unforgivable
March 10, 2015 (13:30) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Following the release of theCycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) report, UCI president Brian Cookson spoke to Cyclingnews about the findings in the 228-page document. Cookson was elected UCI president on September 27, 2013 and quickly moved to set up a"truth and reconciliation" process,which becameCIRC in January 2014, to investigate the role of the UCI in the doping practices of the sport that took place between 1998 to 2013. "This Commission will investigate the problems cycling has faced in recent years, especially the allegations that the UCI has been involved in wrongdoing in the past " allegations which have done so much to hurt the credibility of the UCI and our sport," Cookson said in a UCI press release following the announcement. Cyclingnews: Before the report came out you said that it would be uncomfortable reading. Have you found that to be the case?ADVERTISEMENT Brian Cookson: Yes I think there are elements that are uncomfortable, as I expected. There are other elements that are quite encouraging. Its a pretty accurate picture but I welcome the report and the sport should as well. CN: What elements are uncomfortable reading for you? BC: Im not personally uncomfortable. There are bits that make difficult reading for the UCI as an institution. There are criticisms over how the UCI handled things in the past and Im worried by the extent of the continuing doping that the commission felt was still going on. That means we have to pay attention to the problems. Its also uncomfortable reading for people previously involved with the UCI. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Armstrong could get chance to seek reduced ban
March 10, 2015 (13:30) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
The Daily Telegraph reported today that Lance Armstrong may be given a chance to ask for a reduction to his lifetime ban. UCI President Brian Cookson told the newspaper on Monday that he had been asked to broker a meeting between the disgraced former Tour de France winner and the US Anti-Doping Agency, which levied the lifetime ban against Armstrong as part of its Reasoned Decision in 2012. Cookson said that he had been asked by the Cycling Independent Reform Commission, which on Monday released its report into cyclings doping issues, to facilitate a further discussion between Lance Armstrong and USADA."ADVERTISEMENT Cookson revealed that this was something he was "happy to do," according to the Daily Telegraph, although he emphasised that the commission was not intending to recommend a reduction in the American's ban. "The commission itself did not feel that anything Lance told them was sufficient for them to recommend a reduction in his sanction, and I have no evidence to contradict that," Cookson told the newspaper. "I have no desire to be 'the president that let Lance Armstrong off the hook' or anything like that. I'll take my lead from the CIRC." Cookson said he empathised with Armstrong's contention that he had been treated more severely than his peers, but he also recognised the balancing act that an organisation like USADA had to try and maintain while attempting to catch the PED users. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Column: Time to rethink but not reduce Lance Armstrong's ban (The Associated Press)
March 10, 2015 (00:15) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Add two wheels and Lycra to that story and you start to understand why Lance Armstrong feels he has suffered rough justice. It found that supposed guardians of the sport at the International Cycling Union or UCI, the very people meant to be watching the store and catching thieves like Armstrong who cheated to win, instead helped shield him and cover for his deceit. The scathing 227-page report from the Cycling Independent Reform Commission should be compulsory reading for administrators in all sports, not just cycling. Being a relatively small sport, where ''everyone, or nearly everyone, knows everyone else,'' also made cycling vulnerable, the CIRC found. More...
Cookson to ask Verbruggen to step down as honorary president of the UCI
March 09, 2015 (20:00) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Following the release of the CIRC report into the history of doping in cycling on Monday, UCI president Brian Cookson intends to ask Hein Verbruggen to step down from his position as honorary president of the sport's governing body. Cookson told The Guardian, that Verbruggens collusion with Lance Armstrong during his time as president at the UCI from 1991-2005 was unforgivable. I am very concerned by what I read in the report about Heins actions and I will write to him asking him to consider his position as honorary president, he told The Guardian, adding that Verbruggen had made serious errors of judgment and wrong decisions.ADVERTISEMENT Cookson went on to say that he was shocked by the extent of collusion between the UCI's Verbruggen and Armstrong with regard to the 2005 Vrijman Report, an investigation into the French Anti-doping Agencys (AFLD) handling of urine samples and tests following the 1999 Tour de France where Armstrongs samples showed traces of EPO. The UCI appointed Dutch lawyer Emile Vrijim to head the investigation. The report exonerated Armstrong and said that the AFLDs tests werent conducted properly. It is clear that the UCI never intended it to be fully independent, its clear that Lance Armstrongs lawyers wrote large sections and its clear the UCI was complicit, Cookson said. It was wrong, and it should have been clear from the start it was wrong. It was a major error of judgment and it was unforgivable. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
CIRC finds no proof of UCI corruption but questions linger over governance
March 09, 2015 (20:00) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
The Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) has found that the UCI did not cover up a positive test from Lance Armstrong at the 2001 Tour de Suisse but it has criticised the governing body for failing to open disciplinary hearings against Armstrong and Laurent Brochard for positive tests at the 1999 Tour de France and 1997 Worlds, respectively. Even before the publication of the CIRC report, former UCI president Hein Verbruggen was claiming that he had been vindicated by its findings. "There is nothing under the table and no indication of corruption," he told Reuters over the weekend. Yet while the three-man commission cleared the UCI of corruption in relation to the most high-profile allegation, namely that Armstrong had paid to cover up a 2001 positive test, their report describes the American as benefiting "from a preferential status afforded by UCIleadership." CIRCalso takes a jaundiced view of Verbruggens accumulation of power and ongoing influence through the Pat McQuaid era. The report also voices concerns about Igor Makarov's current influence on the confederations sponsored by his Itera company.ADVERTISEMENT The UCI and Armstrong's lawyers are criticised for their heavy involvement in drafting the ostensibly independent Vrijman report, which examined the accusation " published in L'quipe in 2005 " that Armstrong had used EPO at the 1999 Tour. A link is drawn between Pat McQuaid's decision to allow Armstrong to compete at the 2009 Tour Down Under despite not having been part of the drug-testing pool for a full six months and his subsequent, surprise decision to participate in that year's Tour of Ireland. CIRC also queried why Alberto Contador was informed in person of his positive test for Clenbuterol at the 2010 Tour de France, although it said that it had found no evidence to suggest that the UCI had attempted to cover up the test. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
CIRC: USADA commends Cookson for anti-doping reform
March 09, 2015 (20:00) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
The release of theCycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) report by the sports governing body, the UCI, has been welcomed by USADA's CEO Travis Tygart. The CIRC report does not contain the same explosive accounts of doping in the sport that were contained inUSADA's 2012 reasoned decision, rather it provides a length history of doping in the sport,details of current suspected doping methods and recommendations for the future. The report is based on the findings of Dr. Dick Marty, a former Swiss State Prosecutor, Ulrich Haas, an expert in anti-doping laws, and Peter Nicholson, a former military officer who specialises in criminal investigations. The Commission conducted a 13-month investigation, which was funded by the UCI, that undertook 174 interviews from UCI personnel, teams, federations, doctors, riders and former riders, sponsors, event organisers and journalists. "We welcome the report of the Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) initiated by new UCI President Brian Cookson to address revelations of widespread doping and allegations of UCIs complicity in allowing this fraudulent culture to persist," read a statement from Tygart.ADVERTISEMENT "The Report confirms that, for more than a decade, UCI leaders treated riders and teams unequally- allowing some to be above the rules. The UCIs favouritism and intentional failure to enforce the anti-doping rules offends the principles of fair play and is contrary to the values on which true sport is based. "Sadly, the Report confirms that greed, power, and profit " not truth " motivated UCI leaders and allowed the "EPO" and "blood doping" era to ride rampant. This is a tragic loss for all cyclists who sought to compete clean during that era, and their loss can never be forgotten." The reasoned decision criticised the UCI's role in covering up the doping practises of Lance Armstrong during his seven consecutive Tour de France victories and Tygart praised CIRC for investigating the actions offormer UCI president's Hein Verbruggen and Pat McQuaid and lifting the lid on their actions. You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
Column: Time to rethink but not reduce Lance Armstrong's ban
March 09, 2015 (19:45) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
PARIS (AP) " A short-haired man, his accomplices and hangers-on walk into a jewelry store and help themselves, stuffing their pockets with swag. The store's security guard not only turns a blind eye, he pulls down the shutters to... More...
Column: Time to rethink but not reduce Lance Armstrong's ban (The Associated Press)
March 09, 2015 (19:45) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Add two wheels and Lycra to that story and you start to understand why Lance Armstrong feels he has suffered rough justice. It found that supposed guardians of the sport at the International Cycling Union or UCI, the very people meant to be watching the store and catching thieves like Armstrong who cheated to win, instead helped shield him and cover for his deceit. The scathing 227-page report from the Cycling Independent Reform Commission should be compulsory reading for administrators in all sports, not just cycling. Being a relatively small sport, where ''everyone, or nearly everyone, knows everyone else,'' also made cycling vulnerable, the CIRC found. More...
UCI hid Armstrong dope test, says new chief Cookson (Reuters)
March 09, 2015 (18:15) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong would not have won seven Tour de France titles without receiving favorable treatment from the International Cycling Union (UCI), the current head of the world governing body said on Monday. A report by the Independent Reform Commission published on Monday said previous UCI management were more concerned about their own image rather than tackling doping as the American rode his way to Tour de France glory from 1999-2005. "The style of leadership is pretty much criticized in the report and led to major errors," Brian Cookson told reporters from the UCI headquarters in Aigle, Switzerland. "UCI exempted Lance Armstrong from rules, failed to target test him despite the suspicions, and publicly supported him against allegations of doping," the report said. More...
UCI hid Armstrong dope test, says new chief Cookson (Reuters)
March 09, 2015 (12:00) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong would not have won seven Tour de France titles without receiving favorable treatment from the International Cycling Union (UCI), the current head of the world governing body said on Monday. A report by the Independent Reform Commission published on Monday said previous UCI management were more concerned about their own image rather than tackling doping as the American rode his way to Tour de France glory from 1999-2005. "The style of leadership is pretty much criticized in the report and led to major errors," Brian Cookson told reporters from the UCI headquarters in Aigle, Switzerland. "UCI exempted Lance Armstrong from rules, failed to target test him despite the suspicions, and publicly supported him against allegations of doping," the report said. More...
Armstrong backs investigation into cycling's murky past (The Associated Press)
March 09, 2015 (02:45) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Lance Armstrong welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling's governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and others. The report turned up no evidence to sustain previous allegations that Armstrong paid the UCI to cover up a positive doping test back in his heyday, yet it explains in great detail how the UCI acted favorably toward Armstrong - a rider dubbed ''cycling's pop star.'' The Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) was requested by Brian Cookson, the current UCI president. Its report examined how the doping culture during Armstrong's era was allowed to fester under the previous UCI leadership of former president Pat McQuaid and predecessor Hein Verbruggen. More...
Cycling leaders slammed for letting doping, Armstrong win (The Associated Press)
March 09, 2015 (02:45) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Cycling officials let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to becoming the superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report the governing body released early Monday found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. The report was commissioned by the new UCI leadership to investigate doping that shredded cycling's credibility and led to Armstrong being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in 2012. The UCI's lack of will to curb Armstrong and other riders in an era ''infested'' with use of the blood-boosting hormone EPO is made clear in the Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) report. More...
Cycling: Lance Armstrong and UCI 'colluded to bypass doping accusations'
March 09, 2015 (01:45) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
An independent commission has accused top leaders of cycling's world body of protecting Lance Armstrong despite mounting signs the disgraced Tour de France winner was a doping cheat.The commission also slammed money and benefits... More...
Armstrong backs investigation into cycling's murky past
March 09, 2015 (01:45) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
PARIS (AP) " Lance Armstrong welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling's governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and... More...
Cycling leaders slammed for letting doping, Armstrong win
March 09, 2015 (01:30) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
GENEVA (AP) " Cycling officials let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to becoming the superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture.The International... More...
Armstrong backs investigation into cycling's murky past (The Associated Press)
March 09, 2015 (01:30) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Lance Armstrong welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling's governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and others. The report turned up no evidence to sustain previous allegations that Armstrong paid the UCI to cover up a positive doping test back in his heyday, yet it explains in great detail how the UCI acted favorably toward Armstrong - a rider dubbed ''cycling's pop star.'' The Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) was requested by Brian Cookson, the current UCI president. Its report examined how the doping culture during Armstrong's era was allowed to fester under the previous UCI leadership of former president Pat McQuaid and predecessor Hein Verbruggen. More...
Cycling leaders slammed for letting doping, Armstrong win (The Associated Press)
March 09, 2015 (01:30) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Cycling officials let doping flourish and broke their own rules so Lance Armstrong could cheat his way to becoming the superstar the sport badly needed, according to a scathing report into its drug culture. The International Cycling Union was severely criticized for failing to act during the doping era dominated by Armstrong, but the 227-page report the governing body released early Monday found no evidence that he paid to cover up alleged positive tests. The report was commissioned by the new UCI leadership to investigate doping that shredded cycling's credibility and led to Armstrong being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in 2012. The UCI's lack of will to curb Armstrong and other riders in an era ''infested'' with use of the blood-boosting hormone EPO is made clear in the Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) report. More...
Report: Armstrongs lifetime ban unlikely to be reduced
March 02, 2015 (18:15) [ Indexed from Cyclingnews.com ]
Lance Armstrong's hopes of having his lifetime ban reduced by the Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) appear to have been extinguished according to a report by David Walsh in the The Sunday Times. Having been stripped of his seven Tour de France victories following the 2012 USADA reasoned decision, Armstrong has repeatedly argued that his life-time ban is too harsh a penalty considering former teammates were only handed six-month bans. Armstrong claimed that he would be the first through the door when the Cycling Independent Reform Commission began to interview former dopers. He revealed he spoke to the CIRC investigators twice during 2014 and told the BBC that he had been totally honest, adding, "At this point of my life, I'm not out to protect anybody. I'm out to protect seven people, and they all have the last name Armstrong."ADVERTISEMENT However, the Sunday Times reports that this was not enough for the Commission to even recommend that his ban be reduced. The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) would have the last word on any ban and has always claimed Armstrong gave up on any chance of a reduced ban by failing to cooperate during their investigation. "Despite Mr Armstrong publicly claiming he wants to help, privately since June 2012, he has repeatedly rejected the opportunity to do so and has shut the door on his chance," USADA said last year. "Much of the information we understand that Mr Armstrong could have provided is of little, if any, value now, as it has already been uncovered through other avenues or soon will be." You can read more at Cyclingnews.com More...
APNewsBreak: Armstrong to ride in Livestrong event (The Associated Press)
February 20, 2015 (22:30) [ Indexed from Yahoo! Sports ]
Lance Armstrong is getting back on his bike, this time to raise money for the charity he founded and was later pressured to leave. Armstrong has set up a fundraising team for the Livestrong Challenge ride in Austin in October. It will be his first return to the event since 2012, when a report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency exposed performance-enhancing drug use by Armstrong and his U.S. Postal Service team. Armstrong was later stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles and pressured to leave the Livestrong board. More...
APNewsBreak: Armstrong to ride in Livestrong event
February 20, 2015 (17:30) [ Indexed from New Zealand Herald ]
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) " Lance Armstrong is getting back on his bike, this time to ride and raise money for the charity he founded and was later pressured to leave.Armstrong has set up a fundraising team for the Livestrong Challenge... More...

« Previous | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | Next »

From 121 until 140 / 2081


Most visited today
 - Cycling-Road-Team World Ranking standings (Reuters)
 - Spanish Vuelta Results
 - Tour de France at a Glance (The Associated Press)
 - Giro d'Italia Results
 - Cycling-Road-World Ranking standings (Reuters)
 - 5 things to know about Tour de France (The Associated Press)
 - Cycling-Road-World Championships results (Reuters)
 - Commonwealth Games: New Zealand cyclists earn one gold and two silvers on the track
 - Vuelta a Espana Results
 - Cycling-Road-Clasica San Sebastian results (Reuters)

Most visited last week
 - Cycling: Hamilton jokes with Armstrong in 'strange' meeting
 - Auckland: Do the locomotion
 - Cycling: Kiwis start solidly on opening stage of Giro d'Italia
 - NZ finish para-cycling champs with four medals
 - Tour de France at a Glance (The Associated Press)
 - Cycling-Road-Team World Ranking standings (Reuters)
 - Cycling-Road-World Ranking standings (Reuters)
 - The French Connection helps Auckland move greener
 - Giro d'Italia Results
 - Palm Pre October launch still on track

Funny games